Border

 

Address PO Box 749 Gonubie 5256
Contact Person Ms Cheryl le Roux
Tel Number 043 740 1300
Mobile No 083 568 3600
Email sacee@telkomsa.net

The Border branch of SACEE is one of the ‘busiest’ branches in the country. The main project is the National
‘Language Challenge, open to Grade 4 to Grade 11 learners and the Puzzle Parades’ w
hich are open to Grades 1, 2 and 3 learners.   The 2019 challenges took place on the 6th September. 

 

In addition to the National projects the branch continued to organize many of its other competitions and events
these included –

Poetry Festival
General Knowledge Quiz
Fun with Words
Public Speaking
Short Story Competition
For more information contact sacee@telkomsa.net.

2019 SACEE PUZZLE PARADE AND LANGUAGE CHALLENGE REPORT 

For the past 28 years the SACEE National Language Challenge has provided an English Language bench-marking service to schools for grades 1 to 11. With entries from all 9 provinces of South Africa it reaches a wide range of schools.

In 2019 there was a slight increase in the number of schools that entered which then increased the number of learners who participated. However, at the time of compiling the report 6 schools had not submitted their results.

 

2019

2018

No. of Participants

31 563

29 478

Grade 1 – 3 Puzzle Parade

52 schools

49 schools

Grade 4 – 7 Language Challenge

62 schools

56 schools

Grade 8 – 11 Language Challenge

32 schools

26 schools

Below please find the 2019 results with a comparison to the 2018 results.

                                                                   GRADE

2018

NO. OF LEARNERS

2019

NO. OF LEARNERS

2018 NATIONAL

AVERAGE

2019 NATIONAL AVERAGE

2018 HIGHEST

SCORE

2019 HIGHEST SCORE

1

2870

3104

67,80%

71.04%

54 x 100%

111 x 100%

2

2948

3205

69,92%

74.64%

36 x 100%

61 x 100%

3

2945

3181

77,48%

78.26%

39 x 100%

57 x 100%

4

3372

3445

54,09%

49.53%

98%

90%

5

3050

3429

63,08%

57.13%

98%

97%

6

3269

3473

59,83%

59.09%

97%

97%

7

3284

3143

66,07%

63.61%

100%

99%

8

2138

2574

62,42%

52.89%

94%

93%

9

2042

2338

66,14%

56.33%

96%

95%

10

1804

1819

64,52%

55.44%

97%

94%

11

1756

1852

67,52%

58.52%

99%

100%

TOTAL

29 478

31 563

 

 

 

 

The full list of prizewinners click here.

Special mention should be made of the following schools and learners:

  • Kamaya Maharaj from Star College High School Durban who achieved an amazing 100% in the Grade 11 Language Challenge.
  • Luke de Villers from Bridgehouse who has been a prizewinner in the 2017, 2018 and 2019 Language Challenges.
  • Brownwyn Wilson from Hudson Park Primary School who came 1st overall in her age group for two years in a row.
  • Kayla Marnitz from Stirling High School who was a prizewinner in both 2018 and 2019.
  • Montrose Primary School where 23 learners achieved 100% in the Grade 1 Puzzle Parade.
  • Hudson Park Primary School with two 1st place prizewinners (Grade 6 and Grade 7).

These learners and schools should all be commended for their excellence and noteworthy performance.

We would like to thank all principals, teachers and learners from the schools which participated this year. We trust that you will find the results informative and useful in benchmarking your school’s English Language proficiency against National norms and averages, and, for those schools which have participated in the past, plotting and measuring your progress against previous years.

We encourage all schools to recognize their top performing learners, particularly those who achieved outstanding results. Attached with the report, please find a template for a certificate that can be used to award your top scorers.  

Please note that only the overall top three learners (including tied places) in Grades 4 – 11 are awarded a cash prize.

We ask all schools with prize winners to complete page 4 and send us their banking details by return email so that we can transfer the prize winner’s cash prize into your school account. We would appreciate it if you could award the prize winners their relevant amounts.

Lisa van Tonder

Co-Ordinator: SACEE Language Challenges and Puzzle Parades. 


 

SACEE’S 2019 NATIONAL SHORT STORY COMPETITION

For the fourth year running, the SACEE SHORT STORY NATIONAL COMPETITION, organised by the  SACEE Border Branch Committee, had the pleasure of inviting contributions from schools throughout South Africa.

The competition was open to:

                                      PRIMARY SCHOOLS:      Grade 6 and Grade 7 pupils. 

                                      HIGH SCHOOLS:               Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10 and Grade 11 pupils.

 The DEFINITION of a SHORT STORY is an event, (or a series of events), involving a single or small number of characters which develops towards a climax.

Stories could be about ANY TOPIC of choice. 

The LENGTH of the short story must be EXACTLY 100 WORDS – including the title.


ADJUDICATORS’ COMMENTS

STATISTICS –  a record total of 648 entries in the 2019 100-Word Short Story Competition. There were 543 entries from Primary Schools and 105 High School entrants.  A total of 106 (16%) stories received Gold Awards and 163 (25%) received Silver Awards.

TOPICS – As usual, writers were invited to choose their own topics. The variety of topics included personal experiences, physical and mental illness, death, natural disasters, peer pressure, fear, friendship, crimes against humanity, and fables. Writers showed great maturity, imagination and originality in their stories.

DEFINITION –  A short story is defined as a “tale”, an “account” or an “experience” that should contain a narrative element. Notably, a few entries were not, strictly speaking, “stories” but expository paragraphs. This is an area that teachers may be able to address in class prior to submissions.

PLOT  –  Majority of the writers did exceptionally well with writing unique, striking conclusions – many containing unexpected twists. There were many repetitive themes, such as waking up from dreams, retelling of classic stories (‘Three Little Pigs’), and stories beginning with ‘Once upon a time’ and concluding with ‘The end’. However, overall, the writers excelled at absorbing the reader with their creativity.

PRESENTATION – This year, the writers adhered to 2018s comment to avoid using illustrations. They were well presented. For next year’s competition, it would be advisable to submit typed entries rather than handwritten ones as the copy was rather faint and therefore not easy to read, judge and award.

LANGUAGE – The short story provides a stage for writers to exhibit skilled use and understanding of language and vocabulary. The best stories demonstrated excellent use of punctuation, spelling, direct speech, mature diction, and grammar. Conversely, a number of entries showed that writers struggled with tense errors, correct use of apostrophes (particularly possession) and overuse of the ellipses – especially when concluding stories. Teachers in class may be able to address the effective use of ellipses and the power of a succinct resolution.

LENGTH -The SACEE 100-word Short Story Competition has been running for over 20 years (4 Nationally), and one of its most important features is that all entries must be EXACTLY 100 words (including the title). Unfortunately, far too many writers were either unaware of this requirement or ignored it. We had stories just under 100 words, and whole schools which entered stories of over 150 words, thus disqualifying them. We would request teachers to ensure that the writers are aware of this requirement and edit accordingly. 

OVERALL – Despite the minor problems this report has highlighted, it must be stressed that the SACEE 100-WORD SHORT STORY COMPETITION provides an invaluable platform for young creative writers. The quality of the entries is truly remarkable and the learners show great innovation and maturity in their stories. It is easy to tell that each learner put tremendous thought and effort into their pieces and should be commended for honing their storytelling skills.

A special word of thanks is extended to all teachers and schools who encourage their learners to submit entries to any Creative Writing competitions or festivals. You’re encouraging a generation of thinkers and creatives to find their voice, express themselves and develop self-worth.


GONE

I watched her deflate like a balloon. Sadness washed over her, and her mesmerizing smile slowly dissipated from across her face. What was once a blooming flower turned into nothing but ashes in front of me. She turned her head and gave me a pleading look of despair, longing for something, anything, nothing.

“Well, I should be going now”, Susan whispered, taking one last languishing look over her shoulder at Roxy.

“I’m terribly sorry, but at her age it is the best way to go.” The vet sighed, as he walked back into the room.

And so, she’s gone.

CHRISTINA VAUDRAN – Grade 6:                                                                Auckland Park Preparatory School


NEW WORLD

They told my wife and me about the wonders of the new land; how it stretched for miles and how everything grew in its rich soil.

We had no idea of what would happen on our journey. We sold our house and tavern, packed our bags, then boarded the ship. Hope that this land existed was all we had.

Through the mist we saw our old home disappear in the distance. When we couldn’t see the docks anymore we knew we had reached the point of no return.

Only stories of the promised land lay ahead of us.

MATTHEW MIAH – Grade 7:                                                                                           Stirling Primary School


SCARS

“That’s all for today Mariam, take a break,” my father instructed. He had been tutoring me my whole life; furious that women’s rights had been shackled, he decided to take matters into his own hands . . . despite the evident risks.

I was reading when I heard fierce shouts from downstairs, my blood ran cold as I realised my schoolwork still lay on the table.

A gunshot suddenly rang throughout the air. They were merciless and heard none of my father’s pleading cries. They didn’t even bother giving me the luxury of death, but left me to suffer.

KERRYN HOPKINSON – Form 1 (Grade 8):                                                          Ashton International College


LEAVING HER

His bags were checked in. He was leaving her behind. He got his last glimpses of her as he boarded his flight.

He would miss everything about her. The blazing hot fire she spat when she was mad, and her calm whispers which sang him to sleep every night in his beach cottage. She was unique, one of a kind.

The last thing he saw was her big table. Often decked with a white table cloth, attracting people from all over the world to come and visit her.

And then he never saw her again. His mother city.

LENA KASTNER – Grade 9:                                                                                         Rhenish Girls’ High School


MR INSOMNIA

He visits at odd hours of the morning, arriving with matted hair drenched in cold sweat, owning dark red lips and matching eyes; giving off the stench of prescription pills. He fumbles into my moon-spilt room, his tea-bag eyes affecting his vision. He barely speaks, but his voice is soft and hoarse. He moves in a single continuous motion, almost as though he’s completely at peace, but his rapidly dilating pupils suggest otherwise. He perches on the end of my bed, clutching his knees.

“Hello Mr Insomnia,” I whisper. “I see you’ve come to speak with me again.

SIMONE ANDERSON – Grade 10:                                                                                    Hudson Park High


LITTLE CONSEQUENCE

Motionless as the waters that drowned her she lies, a pathetic sprawl on a sheet of toilet paper.

Cause of death: bathwater. Burial: probably the dustbin.

She makes me wonder, though. If she could never think nor feel, what escaped from her pitiful body when her tiny heart ceased to beat? Did that essence of life go somewhere, or did it only merge with the air I’m breathing?

But I nonchalantly crumple the coffin, and place it gently next to the open window.

“It’s just a moth,” I think to myself.

Just a moth. Just a life. Lifeless.

CAITLIN LAING – Grade 11:                                                                                   Clarendon High School for Girls


For more information please email sacee@telkomsa.net